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EMERGENCIES
For minor injuries that cannot be self-treated, please dial 1-1-1 or go to the nearest Minor Injuries Unit:

Cuts/grazes and lacerations
Sprains and strains
Broken bones (fractures)
Bites and stings (including human/animal bites)
Infected wounds
Minor head injuries
Minor eye infections, foreign bodies and scratches.

If the problem is simple or you are unsure whether a minor injury can be self-treated you could discuss the matter with NHS 111 or consult your local pharmacist.
MINOR INJURIES
Ring NHS 111 for the latest information on location and opening times of your local Minor Injuries Unit
NHS WALK IN CENTRES
NHS walk-in centres (WICs) offer convenient access to a range of treatments.

These include:

infections and rashes
blood pressure checks
fractures and lacerations
emergency contraception and advice
stomachaches
vomitting and diarrhoea
hay fever
insect and animal bites
stitches (sutures)
dressing care
minor cuts and bruises
minor burns and strains
Stop smoking support



NHS WICs are usually managed by a nurse and are available to everyone. Patients do not need an appointment. Most centres are open 365 days a year and outside office hours. Some newly opened centres may offer different opening hours during their first few months.They have proved to be a successful complementary service to traditional GP and A & E Services.

Some NHS WiCs offer access to doctors as well as nurses. However, they are not designed for treating long-term conditions or immediately life-threatening problems.

Some Walk in Centres and Minor Injuries Units do not treat young children. The decision lies with the WIC or minor injuries unit and is based on the capacity, resource or skill levels available. Please contact your local WIC or minor injuries unit in advance if you are not sure if you or your child can be treated there.

When carers have a crisis they often don't know who to contact to arrange replacement care, according to research by Carers UK.

They found that emergency social services took too long to respond, and replacement care services were often not available in an emergency. Carers were not getting back-up, and this sometimes has devastating consequences.

CARING EMERGENCIES
Call Carers Direct on 0300 123 1053
Interpreted call back 170 languages
EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION
Women can get a pill for emergency contraception from sexual health or family planning clinics, their GP or free from certain pharmacies (if under 25). A pill for emergency contraception can be given up to 72 hrs after unprotected sex to reduce your risk of pregnancy.  You can be fitted with an IUD which is far more effective. This can be done at the practice, family planning clinics some GU clinics.

If you need urgent advice call the practice or outside normal hours dial 111.
URGENT DENTAL CARE
If you require urgent dental care, you should contact your own dentist for advice and treatment if required, in the first instance.

If you are not registered with a dentist and find yourself in need of emergency dental care outside of normal working hours, please dial 111 for the NHS 111 service - available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
MENTAL HEALTH EMERGENCY
If a person's mental or emotional state quickly worsens, this can be treated as a mental health emergency or mental health crisis. In this situation, it's important to get help as soon as possible. Dial 111 to find out where help is available.

If you feel the person is in immediate danger then call 999

FIRST AID - CPR
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a first aid technique that can be used if someone is not breathing properly or if their heart has stopped.

Chest compressions and rescue breaths keep blood and oxygen circulating in the body.

If someone is not breathing normally and is not moving or responding to you after an accident, call 999 or 112 for an ambulance. Then, if you can, start CPR straight away.

Hands-only CPR
If you have not been trained in CPR or are worried about giving mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to a stranger, you can do chest compression-only (or hands-only) CPR.

To carry out a chest compression:
Place the heel of your hand on the breastbone at the centre of the personís chest. Place your other hand on top of your first hand and interlock your fingers.
Using your body weight (not just your arms), press straight down by 5Ė6cm on their chest.
Repeat this until an ambulance arrives.

Try to give 100-120 chest compressions a minute.
When you call for an ambulance, telephone systems now exist that can give basic life-saving instructions, including advice on CPR. These are now common and are easily accessible with mobile phones.

CPR with rescue breaths
If youíve been trained in CPR, including rescue breaths, and feel confident using your skills, you should give chest compressions with rescue breaths. If you are not completely confident, attempt hands-only CPR instead (see above).

Adults
Place your hands on the centre of the person's chest and, with the heel of your hand, press down by 5Ė6cm at a steady rate, up to two compressions a second.
After every 30 chest compressions, give two breaths.

Tilt the casualty's head gently and lift the chin up with two fingers. Pinch the personís nose. Seal your mouth over their mouth and blow steadily and firmly into their mouth. Check that their chest rises. Give two rescue breaths, each over one second.

Continue with cycles of 30 chest compressions and two rescue breaths until they begin to recover or emergency help arrives.

Children over one year old
Open their airway by placing one hand on the childís forehead and gently tilting their head back and lifting the chin. Remove any visible obstructions from the mouth and nose.

Pinch their nose. Seal your mouth over their mouth and blow steadily and firmly into their mouth, checking that their chest rises. Give five initial rescue breaths.
Place your hands on the centre of their chest and, with the heel of your hand, press down by one-third of the depth of the chest using one or two hands.
After every 30 chest compressions at a steady rate (slightly faster than one compression a second), give two breaths.

Continue with cycles of 30 chest compressions and two rescue breaths until they begin to recover or emergency help arrives.

Babies under one year old
Open the baby's airway by placing one hand on their forehead and gently tilting the head back and lifting the chin. Remove any visible obstructions from the mouth and nose.

Place your mouth over the mouth and nose of the infant and blow steadily and firmly into their mouth, checking that their chest rises. Give five initial rescue breaths.

Place two fingers in the middle of the chest and press down by one-third of the depth of the chest. After 30 chest compressions at a steady rate (slightly faster than one compression a second), give two breaths.

Continue with cycles of 30 chest compressions and two rescue breaths until they begin to recover or emergency help arrives.

    HOSPITAL EMERGENCY
What is an emergency?

When it comes to your health or the health of someone in your family, it is often very obvious if the person is seriously ill and needs immediate emergency care.

An emergency is a critical or life-threatening situation.
To help you decide what a critical situation is, here are some examples:

loss of consciousness,
a suspected stroke,
severe bleeding that cannot be stopped
suspected broken bones,
a deep wound such as a stab wound,
persistent severe chest pain
difficulty in breathing,
severe burns, and
a severe allergic reaction.
Acute confused state and fits that are not stopping

If an ambulance is needed call 999, the emergency phone number in the UK. You can also dial 112, which is the ambulance number throughout the European Union.


Major A&E departments offer access 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, although not all hospitals have an A&E department. At A&E a doctor or nurse will assess your condition and decide on further action
.



EMERGENCY - DIAL 999
Is it a genuine emergency?
If so, call 999 and donít panic. Always call 999 if someone is seriously ill or injured and their life is at risk.


112 is the single emergency telephone number for the European Union and will get you through to the emergency services wherever you are in the EU.

When you call 999 an operator will answer your call and ask you which emergency service you need. In a medical emergency make sure you ask for the ambulance service and you will be put through to an ambulance call handler who will ask you for your address, the phone number you are calling from and what has happened. This will allow them to determine the most appropriate response as quickly as possible.

At the same time another member of staff, called a dispatcher, will be managing which ambulance resource to send to you.

Do not hang up
Wait for a response from the ambulance control room as they might have further questions for you. The person who handles your call will let you know when they have all the information they need. You might also be instructed on how to give first aid until the ambulance arrives.

When it's not a life-threatening emergency

If the situation is not a life-threatening emergency and you or the person you are with do not need immediate medical attention, consider other options before you dial 999.

If you need an emergency response, the ambulance service will send either an emergency ambulance, rapid response vehicle or motorbike, cycle response unit, a community first responder or a combination of these.

Will an ambulance attend?
Dialling 999 does not necessarily mean that an ambulance wil be dispatched. The call handler will decide what is appropriate after you have given the required information. It may be safe enough for you to be seen elsewhere, or you can be given telephone advice by a medically trained clinical advisor. However, an ambulance will be sent to you if it is a life-threatening emergency.

There are a number of things you can do to assist the ambulance service

if you are in the street, stay with the patient until help arrives
call back the ambulance service if the patient's condition changes
call back the ambulance service if your location changes
If you are calling from home or work, ask someone to open the doors and signal where the ambulance staff are needed
lock away family pets
if you can, write down the patient's details and collect any medication they are taking
if you can, inform the parmedics about any allergies the patient has
stay calm

If appropriate, you may want to call the patient's doctor. The doctor may meet you at the A&E department, or call with important information about the patient.



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